How do you get the data you need? Even when you don’t know what’s out there or even if it exists?

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My new post on LinkedIn is about how looking for the right data is like looking for a needle in  a haystack. But we found a way to match data generators with data users – even for unpredictable data needs.

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“Data Trusts” are a potential way to get data to train AIs. But how do we shepherd a whole flock of Trusts?

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My new blog on LinkedIn is about the organisations which will deal with all the data that our AIs will need to work well. How do we make sure these organisations do not stray?

A blueprint for your Internet of Things ecosystem

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My new article on Linkedin Pulse suggests how firms that make IoT products and services could build their own IoT ecosystems and how they could persuade other firms to join.

How the car industry is building Internet of Things ecosystems.

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My new article on Linkedin Pulse looks at the implications of how the sensors on modern cars can tell manufactures where you drive, how you drive and when it might be about to breakdown. This data could be a massive help to car repair garages, insurers and other firms. But manufactures might want to charge for it and this might increase the cost of servicing your car. So how will firms partner together?

My research suggests strategies for building Internet of Things (IoT) ecosystems in the car industry and other IoT product industries.

 

What is an IoT ecosystem and how does it work?

Internet of Things devices work better together, the more IoT devices that link up the better. So which devices and which apps should yours connect to?

Natural ecosystems can tell us ideas for building Internet of Things ecosystems

In the Internet of Things (IoT), the more devices that connect with each other then the more perspectives and capabilities there are to be shared. More data from different sensors and data suppliers; and more ways to change the real world. Like operating cars, home appliances and other machines or getting really useful options from screens or bots.

If you are a device manufacture or an app developer the problem then is: which devices and apps should yours connect to? If you can potentially link to any device and any app then which are most appropriate?

How do you avoid confusing your users when they use your product? How do you avoid confusing yourself? What to connect to is not a problem for the user. The device manufacture or the app developer needs to figure this one out. Just give users a simple list of high quality options that are personalised to their current situation.

Your product cannot link to every other device on the Internet. So which devices have the most useful perspectives and capabilities? You need a strategy that helps your product to be better at its purpose.

And don’t forget security.

Next, having chosen which other potential devices or apps should work with your product you then need to persuade their makers to partner with you. There might be an API to help you connect but close data sharing and brand associations needs discussions and agreements. And that means you need to get noticed, get taken seriously and get a mutually beneficial deal.

The prize is that the first products to build up their IoT ecosystem of partners will get more data and features to build into better services. As my son knows very well, a bigger and more varied pile of Lego bricks means he can build a more interesting spaceship or a more secretive secret base.

There is a lot of talk about business ecosystems and an ecosystem of IoT devices is a lovely thought in principle, but what actually is it and how do you build one? Looking at natural ecosystems might help us.

Natural ecosystems are glued together by ‘nutrient pathways’

The glue that binds together natural ecosystems, like rain forests, deserts and even a single puddle of water is their nutrient pathways.

What we think of as natural ecosystems are actually the ‘pathways’ that recycle scarce resources. The essence of natural ecosystems are nutrient flows along pathways which are based on the natural activities of many different organisms.

Whatever the ecosystem, the quality that makes a natural ecosystem stand out; the thing that makes people say ‘that collection of organisms and stuff is an ecosystem’ is how it moves resources around itself. Microbes, insects, larger animals and plants and other living things move resources around just by living their lives.

The animals, plants and other organisms can come and go, die off or just move to another ecosystem. The pathways need not be dependent any particular organism or even a single species. But the thing that makes an ecosystem appear to us as an ecosystem is the way it recycles scarce resources.

For example, rain forests actually have relatively few nutrients, the soils are very poor. When leaves fall to the ground they are broken up by tiny organisms. Then the nutrients are absorbed by fungi and quickly recycled back into the trees by their roots.

Recycling and reusing nutrients along specific pathways is what makes one natural ecosystem different to another. Different organisms have different ‘roles’ in the pathways and each role might be performed by several different species.

Business ecosystem pathways glue together the IoT ecosystem

If pathways that recycle scarce resources are the essence of ecosystems then what are the scarce resources that business ecosystems can recycle?

The scarcest resource for most businesses is customer knowledge. Customer knowledge about the situation any individual customer is in at the exact moment when they use your product; and knowledge about how all customers have used the product in different ways and in different situations.

Knowing the situation which an individual customer is in as they are using the product enables the product to be more responsive to the customer. And it enables the customer to get better advice and suggestions for using the product.

Learning about how all customers have used the product in different ways and in different situations helps a firm to improve the design of the product with software upgrades or with hardware redesigns. Or it helps to suggest solutions to common problems that customers find as they use the product. These solutions can even be suggested to customers by the product itself.

For example, Sat Navs make travel route suggestions and cooking apps make recipe suggestions. Knowing more about the bigger picture of the users life – the reason for the journey or the reason for the meal – would suggest more personalised options. Knowing what other users have chosen in similar situations would help generate more options as well as a more accurate link between a suggested option and a given situation.

This sort of information was scarce before devices connected to the Internet because the direct relationship with users was mainly with retailers rather than product manufacturers. Also, an Internet connection enables products to record how they are used and then to send this information back to their manufacturer.

Product usage information can be combined with information from different products and other information about users’ lives. A deep understanding of the wider situation that a product is used in helps it to be used more successfully.

The IoT technology stack is a good way of explaining how smart products can connect up and share data. But how do you build ecosystem’s pathways?

Building an IoT ecosystem by choosing devices to partner with

To start building your ecosystem, first ask ‘What customer knowledge do you need to make using your product more successful as it is used and also as you design and (re)design your Minimum Viable Product?’ Do this for every stage of your users’ journeys.

Next you need to choose the data suppliers who can share the data you need to manufacture this customer knowledge. The data suppliers who you partner with (the devices, apps and other sources) will be the components of your ecosystem pathways. The order in which they work together is the flow plan of the pathways.

And how do you persuade them to do it? Just explain to them how it all works using the logic behind your flow plan of ecosystem pathways. Your flow plan describes how each device or app plays its small part in the wider scheme of your ecosystem’s work just by doing its job.

Each device or app has a job to do, its role.  So your flow plan of ecosystem pathways is also the business model of why your new ecosystem will work.

 

Privacy: Is there a missing third party in our emerging Big Data society? (new white paper)

Personal data can be used for great harm as well as for great good. The more that data is shared between organisations then the more value it can create.

But personal privacy is becoming more and more of an issue, although the way firms handle, share and reuse data is much too complicated for most individuals to be fully aware of or able to deal with if data is mishandled.

For the last year I’ve been running roundtables, interviewing experts and going to workshops to try to look for some answers to these problems. This white paper explains some findings so far.

Personal Big Data: Is there a missing third party in our emerging Big Data society?

 

Executive summary

New Big Data technologies are rapidly changing marketing, healthcare, government, financial services, retailers and whole supply chains.

We are rushing towards a ‘Big Data society’ that is using data analytics to more efficiently target resources and to deliver incredibly personalised user experiences. But the precise use of resources and the personalised delivery of services require access to deeply personal consumer data.

Personal data can be used for great harm as well as for great good. The more that data is shared between organisations then the more value it can create – and the more difficult it is to control who uses it and what they use it for.

The change in how organisations use our personal data is happening whether we like it or not and we risk destroying trust if consumers are harmed or even surprised, by how their personal data is used. We need consumers to trust how their data is used or they will be slower to engage by sharing their data. This will delay the benefits of a Big Data society and leave the UK to be potentially overtaken by other countries with a different view of the importance of consumer trust.

But current systems of legislation and regulation are based on older technologies and ways of working that did not include cheap access to mass data sharing capabilities and personalised data analysis in real-time.

Our investigation incorporates the views of experts from regulators, government, commercial data firms and consumer privacy organisations. It concludes that there are several missing roles in our emerging Big Data society – a missing ‘Third Party’.

This ‘Third Party’ would support individual consumers to deal with networks of large and small firms; help firms to share and use data in new ways in return for doing so appropriately; aid regulators to bridge the gap between the market and individual consumers, staff and firms; and give privacy and consumer organisations a platform to help more consumers and to engage with more firms.

We propose a solution, a design for a ‘Third Party’ that engages the attention and resources of the different stakeholders to watch and help each other. Firms would have a strong interest in behaving appropriately; and in turn they would encourage their staff to behave appropriately and become more successful in the process.

Here is the full white paper: Personal Big Data white paper 3.0.

My new Econsultancy post – Why it’s always good to share in our Big Data society

I did a new post on Econsultancy, the digital marketing blog. It’s about the opportunities and dangers of sharing customer data.

Sharing lets us use our resources much more precisely and produce completely new services. But misusing customer data risks destroying customer trust.

Still, we all need that missing piece of the Big Data puzzle, so we all need to share more. You can read it here.